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In the 2020 book "Molly, Mushrooms & Mayhem: Stories from Inside the Music Festival Medical Tent," Jim Bollenbacher recounts the first time he witnessed the effects of psychedelic mushrooms. He was working as a paramedic at an electronic dance music festival when he was called by security to check on a young man crawling on the floor, picking imaginary things off the ground and out of the air. ...

Elizabeth Waterman was desperate. In setting out to photograph exotic dancers for "Moneygame," her book depicting strippers from a respectful, humanizing and refreshingly female perspective, the fine art photographer never anticipated how many clubs, dancers and publishers would say no. So she started bringing doughnuts for the bouncers; she won over dancers by helping them gather dollar bills ...

November is a lovely month for reading, and for thinking about what books to buy as holiday gifts. (You may have heard: Order early this year.) Here are six fresh-minted options in paperback, to suit a variety of tastes. "Leave the World Behind" by Rumaan Alam (HarperCollins, $16.99). A bestseller and National Book Award finalist, Alam's novel throws two families — strangers to each other — ...

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Mike Katz and Crispin Kott want to take you on a trip through Bay Area music history. If you’re game, all you have to do is pick up a copy of “Rock and Roll Explorer Guide to San Francisco and the Bay Area,” their cool new book detailing where Jerry Garcia, Grace Slick, Tupac Shakur and other music stars lived, walked and worked in the region. It also covers a number of ...

A prize-winning historian broadens and enriches our understanding of the American Revolution. "Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution" by Woody Holton; Simon & Schuster (800 pages, $37.50) ——— When The 1619 Project first appeared in the New York Times Magazine, it came under fire for journalistic whack-a-mole; contributors argued that the primary cause of the American ...

Women writers fought bureaucracy and stereotypes to report from the front lines of World War II. "The Correspondents: Six Women Writers on the Front Lines of World War II" by Judith Mackrell; Doubleday (496 pages, $30) ——— Occasionally, I wonder what it would be like to cover something other than books, perhaps a beat with a tinge of danger beyond paper cuts. However, after reading Judith ...

An informative and engaging — but largely speculative — account of the role of a mostly forgotten Native leader of the first Anglo-Indian Wars in Virginia. "A Brave and Cunning Prince: The Great Chief Opechancanough and the War for America" by James Horn; Basic Books (320 pages, $30) ——— In 1561, Spanish explorers abducted an Indian boy from his home in what is now coastal Virginia. They took ...

A love story to Galloway and its cattle — a quixotic tale of determination and wonder. "Galloway: Life in a Vanishing Landscape" by Patrick Laurie; Counterpoint (272 pages, $16.95) ——— "Galloway: Life in a Vanishing Landscape" is Patrick Laurie's elegy to Galloway, his birthplace, a rugged, forgotten region on the southwest coast of Scotland. For centuries it was known for Galloway cattle, a ...

"These Precious Days: Essays" by Ann Patchett; Harper (320 pages, $26.99) ——— Ann Patchett’s splendid new essay collection, "These Precious Days," overflows with life — the joys of friendship, the bonds of family, the delights of bookstores and dogs, the mysteries (even to her) of writing. It’s warm and funny and smart and full of unexpected insights. What more could you ask from a book that ...

I’ve been reading the diaries of teenagers. Or rather, not diaries, but autobiographies, most of which were written anonymously, scribbling into notebooks that had been locked away for decades. Some of these stories were long, some were short, some exuberant and some anxious. Of the six recounted in “When I Grow Up” (Bloomsbury, $28), most of their authors died soon after writing. They were ...

MINNEAPOLIS — Robert Bly, the National Book Award-winning poet who started out writing bucolic poems about rural Minnesota and went on to shake up the complacent world of 1950s poetry, rail against war, bring international poets to Western readers, and become a bestselling author teaching men how to be in touch with their feelings, died Sunday, just a month before his 95th birthday. In his ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Nov. 13, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Stranger in the Lifeboat. Mitch Albom. Harper 2. The Judge’s List. ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Nov. 13, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "The Stranger in the Lifeboat: A Novel" by Mitch Albom (Harper) Last ...

Jason Mott won the fiction prize for his novel “Hell of a Book” at the 2021 virtual National Book Awards Wednesday night, hosted inside the offices of Penguin Random House. “Hell of a Book” opens as the story of a Black author touring the country to promote his novel, but it soon broadens to take on themes of love, family and what it means to be Black in America. Tiya Miles was awarded the ...

Nikole Hannah-Jones understands power. How it is nurtured, how it protects itself and most importantly, how not to give it away. Unfortunately, lessons about power are rarely pleasurable. There is a cost. It can hurt. Burn. Sometimes scar. One reason Hannah-Jones understands power so well is because she has had her fair share of public run-ins with it from the moment "The 1619 Project" series ...

"The Dark Hours" by Michael Connelly; Little, Brown (400 pages, $29) ——— As Michael Connelly’s extraordinary new novel, "The Dark Hours," begins, all of Los Angeles is waiting for 2020, that miserable year, to end. LAPD Detective Renée Ballard knows the safest place to be at the stroke of midnight: under the Cahuenga overpass, in the middle of a homeless encampment. Every cop on the force is ...

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Andrew Roberts draws on a newly released cache of documents to provide a detailed biography of King George III that presents him in a whole new light. "The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of George III" by Andrew Roberts; Penguin Random House (560 pages, $40) ——— In "Common Sense," a literary bombshell that went through 25 printings in 1776 alone, Thomas Paine blasted King George ...

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A biography of the critic and novelist who married poet Robert Lowell — and paid for it dearly. "A Splendid Intelligence: The Life of Elizabeth Hardwick" by Cathy Curtis; W.W. Norton (400 pages, $35) ——— In 20th-century American literary circles the work of Elizabeth Hardwick inspired admiration, awe and not a little fear. Critic, essayist and novelist, Hardwick was renowned for her uncanny ...

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I’ve been reading memoirs by Korean Americans. Not because I set out to. But because, as they say, I heard good things about this one, heard good things about that one. Soon you realize, like most memoirs, regardless of the author, the real subject is identity. But unlike most memoirs, there’s not a dud in this bunch. “Tastes Like War” (The Feminist Press, $18) by Grace M. Chow, which is up ...

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FICTION: Jenny Shank's stories paint a vivid portrait of Denver, a changing and diverse city. "Mixed Company: Stories" by Jenny Shank; Texas Review Press (245 pages, $21.95) ——— The 12 stories in Jenny Shank's affecting new collection, "Mixed Company," live up to the book's title: Shank's characters navigate the fraught encounters that arise when people of different racial and economic ...

"Viral: The Search for the Origin of Covid-19" by Alina Chan and Matt Ridley; Harper (416 pages, $30) ——— Alina Chan, a molecular biologist at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has become one of the leading exponents of the hypothesis that the virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic leaked from a Chinese laboratory. Matt Ridley, a much-published science writer and member of the British House ...

"Did you hear about the rose that grew from a crack in the concrete? Proving nature's laws wrong, it learned to walk without having feet." For most of his life, Michael Tubbs has carried around that verse, from Tupac Shakur's poem "The Rose that Grew from Concrete," like a mantra in his head — a reminder to himself of where he came from and why it matters. When Tubbs was 6, his father was ...

I'm not sure there is any experience more poignant than caring for an elderly pet in its final months; I'm not sure there's any creature on Earth sweeter than an old dog. Jenna Blum captures the sorrow and joy, the sweetness and grief in "Woodrow on the Bench" (Harper, $22.99), her memoir of caring for her old black Lab during his final months. We first meet Woodrow when he's 15 — quite old ...

Sad yet wryly funny, poet Mona Arshi's debut novel vividly depicts the troubled coming-of-age of a British Indian girl. "Somebody Loves You" by: Mona Arshi; And Other Stories (176 pages, $16.95) ——— Deliberately based in Sheffield, England — away from the typical publishing centers of London and Oxford — the publishing company And Other Stories aims "to push people's reading limits and help ...

A Nigerian editor deals with American racism in this gripping, compassionate novel. "New York, My Village" by Uwem Akpan; W.W. Norton (404 pages, $27.95) ——— When Ekong Udousoro gets the chance to travel from his native Nigeria to the United States to understudy at a New York publisher, he jumps at the opportunity. He'll get the chance to work on the anthology about the Biafran War that he's ...

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