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Presley never wrote a memoir. Nor did he keep a diary. His music could have been a window into his inner life, but he didn’t even write his songs.

"Blood Syndicate" is back, and Milestone Comics' most hardcore and at times controversial series is pulling no punches in its updated revival of a group of gang-affiliated people who gain various superpowers and form a rough-edged alliance in order to protect their neighborhood from criminals. "'Blood Syndicate' has always been the bastard child of comics. People were always afraid to touch ...

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“Everything I Need I Get From You: How Fangirls Created the Internet As We Know It” (MCD, $18) is partly about One Direction, and “This Is Not a Book About Benedict Cumberbatch” (Putnam, $17) is, yes, mostly about Benedict Cumberbatch. But the real subject of both these wonderfully fresh takes on fandom is the unabashed, self-aware embrace of joy. Kaitlyn Tiffany, a writer at The Atlantic, uses her love of One Direction ingeniously to trace how online culture came to feel. And Tabitha Carvan, now long out of adolescence, wrestles bravely with an embarrassing addiction to the former Sherlock but also considers the way we treat women who feel deeply: “When a lot of women love anything, that’s all we need to know about it.” Subversively important stuff.

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Just three days after he finished documenting Epik High’s concert at Coachella, photographer-musician Isné Bobo Nuyent was back home in Los Angeles doing a Zoom interview to promote his latest pop-punk single “No More Talking” (https://streamlink.to/nomoretalking). The Vietnamese American artist spent two months on the road with the hip-hop trio, photographing them nightly and creating short videos of their daily events to share with the group’s fans. And after weeks of getting an average of four hours of sleep per night, he said he’s looking forward to resting a bit and hanging out with his parents and sister.

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Time paired with a few ingredients turn tea into this enjoyable fermented drink from a successful kombucha brewer.

Thousands of Iraqi Kurds have gathered to celebrate Nowruz, the Kurdish new year that also marks the first day of spring. People in the northe…

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At the end of World War II, more American women worked outside the home than ever before. Yet the culture, from politicians to corporations to television shows, portrayed the ideal woman as a housewife. Many women happily assumed that role, but a small segment bucked the tide — women who wanted to use their talents differently, especially in jobs that had always been reserved for men.

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The late Anthony Bourdain’s series “Parts Unknown” and “No Reservations” took viewers all over the world; now "In the Weeds," a recent book by Bourdain’s longtime director, Tom Vitale, reveals what it was like to film the shows. “In the Weeds” is more than a behind-the-scenes peek — it’s a thoughtful and penetrating portrait of Bourdain, whose passion for life, curiosity about cultures and love of a great meal revolutionized the way we think about travel. Vitale, who narrates the audiobook, shares his own observations, which are every bit as evocative as what viewers saw on screen.